Friday, September 30, 2016

"Suspect in two Texas killings, kidnapping had been deported three times"

"Suspect in two Texas killings, kidnapping had been deported three times"


Summary: In Dallas, Texas Tuesday the 27th, police have brought in suspect Juan Navarro Rios for the murders of two civilians. The police ran his records, and found that he had previously been deported from the United States under felony charges. Rios is an illegal immigrant from Mexico and has entered the United States under various aliases, causing police difficulty when investigating his true identity. Rios has been listed under "repeat offenders" by US Border Control, yet has somehow managed to enter the country man times. The issue of illegal immigration and the immigration process in general has been on the hot table, and Rios's case has shown light on the flaws in the immigration system as it exists. Rios's actions have made a negative impression of illegal immigrants in the Dallas community.

Connection: This can be related to the formation of the US Border Patrol in 1924 that established a weak and flawed border protection agency that did little to ensure security. It can also be related to the Immigration act of 1990, which was an attempt to have greater border protection. In modern days, the most obvious connection is to the 2016 presidential race, which features candidates with very heated positions about immigration.

Further Questions: 
How might both Trump and Hillary use this event to argue for their immigration policies?
How can stereotypes be motivators?
Do you believe deportation to be an effective tool?
If not, how else should the US deal with illegal immigrants who commit crimes?

Source(s): 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/09/29/suspect-in-two-killings-kidnapping-had-been-deported-three-times-authorities-say/?hpid=hp_hp-morning-mix_mm-texas%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/09/28/us/ap-us-shooting-suspect-deportations.html?_r=0

9 comments:

  1. Stereotypes are definitely a huge contributor to many things, other than immigration. For example: airports. Towards anyone to even APPEARS to be Muslim, it is evident that people react in a racist way. Why? All because of the event that happened on September 11th, 2011. After that date, airports and attitudes of Americans towards Muslim changed completely. Extreme security was implanted into airports everywhere. Americans and others were beginning to blame all Middle Easterners and all Muslims for the events that occurred on 9/11. This stereotyping and racism even took place on planes themselves. For example, in August 2016, two islamic women were kicked off of a plane for making a white male flight attendant "uncomfortable" (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/06/us/2-muslim-american-women-ordered-off-american-airlines-flight.html?_r=0). Although race claims not to have been a cause, it still seems that racial stereotyping of Muslims is still present today.

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    1. Immigration of Muslims is also a hot topic in American Politics as well. You bring up a good point about the effects of stereotypes in society, yet don't generalize that all are racists... there are good people out there!
      How do you think the Muslim-community should react to those who hurt the good name of their people by committing violent acts?
      How can the US Government better serve these people, balancing justice with safety?

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    2. Also.. what happened on September 2011? If you are referring to 9/11/2001, I would also point out the politics of the time (George Bush as president) which helped accelerate this air of discrimination. The "attitudes of Americans" as you describe may have been embellished by the government as a fear tactic to push more conservative legislation.

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  2. I think that stereotypes can help motivate people to prove others wrong of what they may think of them. Many immigrants affected by this incident may help them try to prove to people that they aren't criminals, which may be hard, but it isn't impossible for sure. I believe that deportation may not be the most effective way to deal with criminals because kicking them out makes them want to come back even more. To deal with illegal immigrants that commit crimes, they should put them in jail and lock them up so that they cannot do anything more to harm other citizens.

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  3. Trump will most likely use this event to stereotype all illegal immigrants and promote his plan for deportation. Stereotypes are used to fuel fear, and can motivate people to assume and label people who look or act a certain way. From personal experience, many people assumed I was Muslim when I was younger, because I was brown and because my name was Shazaib. I doubt that deportation is effective at all, because our border patrol is so weak, anyone can get into the US now. Rather than just deporting the citizens, we must deport them and work with the country that they are from in order to punish them according to the crimes committed.

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  4. This could be a helpful tool to both Clinton and Trump to possibly revise their immigration reform plans (possibly strengthen it regarding Rios's case). The thoughts of stereotypes is pretty known to everybody. We all know that they often assume somebody of a certain race to be thinking or acting like other people of that race that they see (e.g: from my personal experience I was labelled by some of them as a Latina because I look like one (when I don't) and because of my surname). They could be motivators of negativity around immigration in general. With deportation, I don't see it being an effective repercussion because that would only urge the illegal immigrants to sneak into the US more and will continue to break the rules. Maybe an effective negotiation between the US and the countries involved would be a solution.

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  5. I think that trump and Hillary could use this event to strengthen immigration policies. We should have more tightened security of the boarders so criminals cannot sneak back in after being deported. We do have to realize that a normal US citizen could be a criminal and do just as horrific violence as an illegal immagrant.

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  6. I think that they should lock up the illegal immigrants so that they don't harm other citizens.

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  7. Trump and Hillary may use this event to bring down one another's immigration policies, in which one accuses ones policies insufficient. I do not believe that deportation would be an effective tool, for people like Rios find ways of successfully returning to the country. It would be better to focus on improving the existing immigration system than the removal of those who are in the country illegally. In the case of the US dealing with illegal immigrants who commit crimes, the US should still deport them. However, they should be able to effectively keep them out of the country after their deportation.

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